English as a Second Language

http://www.miracosta.edu/ESL

The English as a Second Language (ESL) discipline includes courses in academic writing, reading and vocabulary development, grammar, and speaking and listening skills. Credit ESL courses emphasize critical thinking and clear communication to prepare and support students in all college-level work. Courses numbered 50 through 99 are associate-degree applicable. ESL 149 and ESL 150, our composition courses, are UC/CSU transferable and lead students directly to ENGL 100All courses are specially designed for students from multilingual/ESL backgrounds, and are taught by instructors with specialized training to assist with higher-level academic English skill development. Students build advanced English skills to succeed in all college courses, to earn a degree or certificate, to transfer, or to improve their English skills for success in the workplace or community settings.

Contact Information

Chair: Mary Gross

Dean: Dana Smith

www.miracosta.edu/ESL

Department: English as a Second Language

Office: Administration, San Elijo Campus, 760.634.7879

Full-Time Faculty

Mary Gross
Melissa Lloyd-Jones

How to Read Course Descriptions

For more detailed information about a course, such as its content, objectives, and fulfillment of a degree, certificate, or general education requirement, please see the official course outline of record, available at http://www.miracosta.edu/governance/coursesandprograms/courseoutlines.html.

Courses

ESL 20: Listening and Speaking for Non-Native Speakers of English

Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Lecture 3 hours. (4930.86)
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

This course emphasizes the development of aural and oral competence in standard American English through listening to and participating in a variety of communicative activities. It offers instruction and practice in listening and speaking skills to develop students' ability to understand and participate in conversations, discussions, and other interpersonal communication in academic, work-related, and social contexts. Practical applications include participating in small group discussions, working on individual pronunciation and intonation variations, and developing academic note taking competence. Offered pass/no pass only.

ESL 30: Reading and Vocabulary Development for Non-Native Speakers of English

Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Lecture 3 hours. (4930.85)
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

This course is designed for non-native speakers who are making the transition to the use of academic English and who require the development of reading and vocabulary skills needed for academic and workplace success. Students read a variety of texts and apply appropriate reading strategies as well as participate in activities to advance vocabulary and facilitate comprehension. Offered pass/no pass only.

ESL 40: Grammar for Non-Native Speakers of English

Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Lecture 3 hours. (4930.87)
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

This course reviews basic grammar for non-native speakers of American English and emphasizes standard usage. Topics include parts of speech, clauses, verb forms and tenses, noun usage, mechanics, punctuation, and sentence types. This course is designed for non-native speakers who are making the transition to the use of academic English and who require the development of grammatical skills for educational and workplace success. Offered pass/no-pass only.

ESL 80: Advanced Grammar for Writing for Non-Native Speakers of English

Units: 3
Prerequisites: None
Lecture 3 hours. (4930.87)
Course Typically Offered: Fall or Spring

This course provides instruction and practice in the more complex elements of English grammar and usage in writing for non-native speakers of American English. By developing and refining grammatical skills, students learn to express complex ideas and create engaging, structurally sophisticated sentences in written English. Completion of this course enhances student success in college courses, particularly ENGL 100.

ESL 149: Introduction to Academic Writing for Students from Multilingual Backgrounds

Units: 4
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with prior credit in ACE 49, ACE 149, ENGL 49, or ESL 49.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (4930.84)
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer

This course is designed for students from diverse language backgrounds who are making a transition to the use of academic English and who require the development of writing skills. The course emphasizes critical thinking, reading, and writing. It provides practice in gathering, organizing, and communicating information and in applying the principles and conventions of standard edited American English. (Formerly ESL 49.)

ESL 150: Introduction to College Composition for Students from Multilingual Backgrounds

Units: 4
Prerequisites: ACE 149, ENGL 49, ESL 149, or eligibility determined by the English placement process.
Enrollment Limitation: Not open to students with prior credit in ACE 50, ACE 150, ENGL 50, or ESL 50.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
Lecture 3.50 hours, laboratory 1.50 hours. (4930.84)
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer

This course, designed for students from diverse language backgrounds, offers intensive practice in the writing process, critical reading, and critical thinking. It also provides practice in acquiring, synthesizing, and communicating information and in applying the principles and conventions of standard edited American English. (Formerly ESL 50.)

ESL 292: Internship Studies

Units: 0.5-3
Prerequisites: None
Corequisite: Complete 75 hrs paid or 60 hrs non-paid work per unit.
Enrollment Limitation: Instructor, dept chair, and Career Center approval. May not enroll in any combination of cooperative work experience and/or internship studies concurrently.
Acceptable for Credit: CSU
Course Typically Offered: To be arranged

This course provides students the opportunity to apply the theories and techniques of their discipline in an internship position in a professional setting under the instruction of a faculty-mentor and site supervisor. It introduces students to aspects of the roles and responsibilities of professionals employed in the field of study. Topics include goal-setting, employability skills development, and examination of the world of work as it relates to the student's career plans. Students must develop new learning objectives and/or intern at a new site upon each repetition. Students may not earn more than 16 units in any combination of cooperative work experience (general or occupational) and/or internship studies during community college attendance.